Announcements

Addition of Second Technical Staff Member and iSCSI Project

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce that Edward Tomasz Napierala has joined as its second member of technical staff. This is a continuation of the Foundation's plan to invest in staff in 2013.

A FreeBSD committer since 2007, Edward previously completed a number of projects under Foundation grants, including safe device removal with mounted filesystems, growing mounted filesystems, and resource containers.

Edward is currently implementing a native in-kernel iSCSI stack (both target and initiator) for this increasingly popular block storage protocol. "Although there are a number of iSCSI target implementations that support FreeBSD, the project lacks a high performance and reliable in-kernel target. As iSCSI gains favor, this stack will be a key element in maintaining FreeBSD's competitive position in enterprise and open-source deployments," said Justin T. Gibbs, president of the FreeBSD Foundation. The project is expected to be completed in October 2013.

Another part of Edward's responsibilities will be assisting the FreeBSD Security Team in preparing security advisories and patches.

Edward lives in Warsaw, Poland.

The FreeBSD Foundation is Accepting Travel Grant Applications for BSDCan 2014!

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses to BSDCan 2014.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application at http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/documents/TravelRequestForm.pdf by April 7, 2014 to apply for this grant.

How it works:

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

(1) You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs (economy airfare, trainfare, ...), accommodations (conference hotel and sharing a room), and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

(2) We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

(3) We reimburse costs based on actuals (receipts), and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We also do not cover meal/food/alcohol expenses. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, and may include in our semi-annual newsletter and our blog.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

FreeBSD Foundation's Year-End Fundraising Campaign!

Dear FreeBSD Community,

Your donations have helped make FreeBSD the best open source operating system available! By investing in The FreeBSD Foundation you have helped us keep FreeBSD a high-performance, secure, and stable operating system.

Thanks to people like you, the FreeBSD Foundation has been proudly supporting the FreeBSD Project and community for over 13 years now. We are incredibly grateful for all the support we receive from you and so many individuals and organizations that value FreeBSD. As of this writing we have raised $427,000 towards our goal of raising $1,000,000. Would you consider making a gift to support our work in 2014?

Donations can easily be made here: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/.

This year your donations helped FreeBSD by:

  • Funding development projects to improve FreeBSD, including: Native iSCSI kernel stack, Updated Intel graphics chipset support, Integration of Newcons, UTF-8 console support, Superpages for ARM architecture, and Layer 2 networking modernization and performance improvements.
  • Hiring two more staff members to help with FreeBSD development projects, security, and release engineering.
  • Educating the public and promoting FreeBSD. We are preparing the debut our new online magazine, the FreeBSD Journal. We created high-quality brochures to teach people about FreeBSD. We also visited companies to help facilitate collaboration efforts with the Project.
  • Sponsoring BSD conferences and summits in Europe, Japan, Canada, and the US.
  • Protecting FreeBSD IP and providing legal support to the Project.
  • Purchasing hardware to build and improve FreeBSD project infrastructure.

But are you aware of the tangible benefits derived from our support of the FreeBSD community? Providing travel grants to FreeBSD volunteers is a great way to invest in the future of FreeBSD. One person we sponsored is Google Summer of Code student Mike Ma, who had the chance to present his work at EuroBSDCon. During his presentation he received valuable input that will help improve and verify his GSoC work. By attending the conference, he had the opportunity to meet passionate FreeBSD developers who inspired him to learn as much as he could about their different projects. This encouraged him to continue working with his mentor and get involved in his mentor’s work as well as some lldb work.

Now that Mike’s back at his university, he's been busy promoting and advocating FreeBSD. In fact he's so passionate about the Project now that he convinced a friend who is working on programming languages to work on the clang project, because it's relevant to his own work.

This one investment helped FreeBSD by providing an environment for a student to get more involved in the Project, and bring that enthusiasm back to his university to promote FreeBSD and encourage more students to get involved. This is an investment in the next generation of FreeBSD developers.

Donate today to help us continue and increase our support of the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide! Making a donation is quick and easy. Click here to make a donation.

Thank you for your support!

Sincerely,

Deb Goodkin
Secretary/Treasurer
The FreeBSD Foundation

IPv6 Performance Analysis Project Completed

Earlier this year the FreeBSD Foundation announced that together with iXsystems it had awarded Bjoern Zeeb a grant to analyze the performance of FreeBSD's Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) stack.

FreeBSD is well known as a network stack reference and research platform. With the expanding installed base of IPv6 systems throughout the world, more focus was brought to making sure that the IPv6 subsystem remained at performance parity with its IPv4 counterpart.

"'IP feature parity' is what our users expect. Closing the gap between IPv6 and IPv4 in terms of performance has become more important as IPv6 is seeing a significant increase in public deployments", says Bjoern Zeeb. "This will help to keep the resource usage at the same level as traffic patterns shift towards IPv6."

One feature that received special attention was hardware assisted offload support: Large/TCP Segment Offload (LSO/TSO) and Large Receive Offload (LRO). Getting the basic support done was very important, as it allows FreeBSD, together with network card vendors, to further improve performance. IPv6 Extension Headers can be taken into account when defining new interfaces and improved basic network packet data types will ease offload implementations in all network card drivers in the future.

Having offload support in the network stack immediately helps loopback performance. Turning on "offloading" for IPv6 avoids expensive calculation and validation of upper layer (TCP and UDP) checksums.

With IPv6, TCP performance is now basically on par with IPv4 in the offloading case, allowing 10 Gbps line speed connections. This is a huge step forward. UDP throughput has increased and is closer to the level of IPv4. Changes to locking allowing better parallelism, which is a step in the right direction.

Initial numbers showing the differences of the work can be found here.

"I'd love to thank the FreeBSD Foundation and iXsystems for sponsoring the project and hope that it will help the community deploying IPv6" closes Bjoern.

The auditdistd project has completed!

Pawel Jakub Dawidek provides the following report regarding the project:

I'm happy to report that the auditdistd project I was working under sponsorship from the FreeBSD Foundation is complete.

The auditdistd daemon is now part of the OpenBSM package and will be available in its next release.

The auditdistd daemon nicely complements the audit framework. It allows one to distribute audit records collected locally with minimal latency to another system. This helps in postmortem analysis, as we know that at least to some point in time audit logs stored on a separate machine can be trusted. This is very important, because once the system is compromised, we cannot trust any of its local files.

One of the most important goals was to make the daemon very secure. We really don't want any weakness in the auditdistd protocol to allow a break into the machine where audit logs are collected. To achieve this, the daemon makes heavy use of sandboxing mechanisms, including Capsicum, if supported by the operating system.

The daemon can act as a sender, as a receiver, or as both. The whole communication between two auditdistd daemons is secured by TLS encryption. Low latency is achieved by using the kqueue mechanism to monitor local trail files and by sending new audit records as quickly as possible.

For more information on how to setup auditdistd please visit its wiki page.

I'd like to thank the FreeBSD Foundation for sponsoring this project and I hope that it will meet the expectations of the FreeBSD community.

George Neville-Neil Joins Board of Directors

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of George Neville-Neil to its board of directors.

George has been dabbling in the BSD world since his undergraduate days in the mid-1980s. He was granted his commit bit in 2004, and has served two terms on the FreeBSD Core team between 2006 and 2010.

In 2011, he started organizing the semi-annual FreeBSD Vendor Summits that gather commercial customers of FreeBSD along with project members in order to facilitate the movement of technologies between the Project and its customers.

George co-authored "The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System." His technical contributions are mostly within the FreeBSD network stack with occasional forays into other parts of the system.

"The Foundation is at a pivotal point in our growth as a company," said Deb Goodkin, Secretary/Treasurer, The FreeBSD Foundation. "We believe with George's previous and current involvement in FreeBSD, that he will be a significant contributor in helping us achieve our ambitious goals this year."

Accepting Travel Grant Applications for EuroBSDCon 2012!

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses for EuroBSDCon 2012.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application at http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/documents/TravelRequestForm.pdf by September 19, 2012 to apply for this grant.

How it works:

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

(1) You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs (economy airfare, trainfare, ...), accommodations (conference hotel and sharing a room), and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

(2) We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

(3) We reimburse costs based on actuals (receipts), and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, post on our blog, and include in our semi-annual newsletter.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

Five New TCP Congestion Control Algorithms Project Completes!

We're pleased to announce the completion of another Foundation funded project.

Project Coordinator Professor Grenville Armitage provided the following summary for us:

Background

TCP is a crucial part of any modern operating system. FreeBSD's standard "NewReno" congestion control (CC) is not able to fully utilize the high capacity links available today. A range of newer CC algorithms have emerged (and continue to emerge) from the networking research community over the past 15+ years. These include traditional loss-based algorithms (where packet losses indicate network congestion) and delay-based algorithms (where changes in Round Trip Time, RTT, are used to infer network congestion).

However, to date FreeBSD's TCP stack has not had an easy-to-use mechanism for introducing new CC algorithms. In recent years the Centre for Advanced Internet Architectures (CAIA) at Swinburne University of Technology has (with the support of the Cisco University Research Program Fund at Community Foundation Silicon Valley) been developing a range of extensions to the FreeBSD TCP stack. These included a modular framework for adding new CC algorithms and new modular implementations of the existing NewReno algorithm, four other algorithms from the literature (H-TCP, CUBIC, Vegas and HD) and a novel algorithm developed at CAIA (CHD). In mid-2010 the FreeBSD Foundation funded CAIA to complete, tidy up and commit a number of these key enhancements to the FreeBSD TCP stack.

Delivered

Our project, "Five New TCP Congestion Control Algorithms for FreeBSD", has delivered the following enhancements to FreeBSD's TCP stack:

  • Modular congestion control framework.
  • Khelp (Kernel Helper) and Hhook (Helper Hook) frameworks.
  • Basic Khelp/Hhook (Kernel help/hook) integration with the TCP stack.
  • ERTT (Enhanced Round Trip Time) Khelp module for delay-based TCP algorithms.
  • Modularised implementations of NewReno, CUBIC and HTCP loss-based TCP CC algorithms.
  • Modularised implementations of Vegas, "HD" and "CHD" delay-based TCP CC algorithms.
  • Technical report comparing the computational overhead associated with TCP before and after integrating the new frameworks and modularised NewReno algorithm.

Benefits

Each congestion control algorithm is implemented as a loadable kernel module. Algorithms can be selected to suit the application/network characteristics and requirements of the host's installation. The modular CC framework also makes it much easier for developers to implement new algorithms, allowing FreeBSD's TCP to be at the forefront of advancements in this area, while still maintaining the stability of its network stack.

CUBIC and HTCP are variants of TCP that provide significant performance improvements (relative to NewReno) over high bandwidth, high latency paths. Vegas, HD, and CHD utilise RTT fluctuations to provide a more timely indication of network congestion -- by not forcing network queues to overflow, delay-based CC algorithms can help to keep queuing delays low along a network path. CHD is also tolerant of packet losses that are unrelated to congestion (such as can occur over wireless links).

In addition, the Khelp/Hhook frameworks provide useful kernel infrastructure which are not specific to the TCP stack and we anticipate they will be used elsewhere in the kernel in the future to provide other unrelated enhancements to FreeBSD.

Participants

Code development, testing, and documentation: David Hayes and Lawrence Stewart

Editorial review of code and documentation: Rui Paulo and Bjoern Zeeb

Project supervision: Grenville Armitage

Project URL: http://caia.swin.edu.au/freebsd/5cc/

End-of-Year Fundraising Campaign

Dear FreeBSD Community,

As the year is winding down I'm writing this note to remind you of the motivation behind the FreeBSD Foundation's work, its benefits to you, and to ask for your financial assistance in making our work possible.

Ten years ago, I created the FreeBSD Foundation to repay a debt I owe to the FreeBSD project. While working on FreeBSD I learned the fundamentals of sound software design, how to successfully manage a large code base, and experienced the challenges of release engineering. Beyond the benefits of this education, FreeBSD has provided a robust platform that has allowed me to build several successful commercial products while being well paid to work on an operating system I love. Today, through my volunteer work with the FreeBSD Foundation, I'm still paying down this debt.

This year, despite the slow pace of the economic recovery, the FreeBSD Foundation has an impressive list of accomplishments:

  • Provided $100,000 in grants for projects that improve FreeBSD in the areas of:
    • DTrace support
    • High availability storage
    • Enhanced SNMP reporting
    • Virtualization and resource partitioning
    • Embedded device support
    • Networking stack improvements
  • Allocated $50,000 for equipment to enhance FreeBSD project infrastrutture.
  • Sponsored 8 FreeBSD related conferences.
  • Funded 16 travel grants giving increased community and developer access to conferences.
  • Provided legal support to the FreeBSD project.

How do our activities benefit you? If you are a company using FreeBSD, our work to strengthen the FreeBSD community ensures the continued viability of FreeBSD and a large pool of developers to tap into. If you are an end user, our work brings you new features and access to conferences. And if you are a FreeBSD developer, the FreeBSD Foundation is providing the resources needed to make your next innovation possible.

The FreeBSD project thrives through the hard work of our community, but it also requires financial backing. This year we set a fund-raising goal of $350,000. We are pleased to report that we are half way there, but we need your help to reach our goal. Every donation, no matter its size, helps to make our work possible. As a non-profit with very low overhead, your donation is the best way to invest in FreeBSD. Please make that investment today.

You can make a donation (including recurring subscriptions) by going to:

http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

To find out more about The FreeBSD Foundation, please visit:

http://www.freebsdfoundation.org

Thank You,

Justin T. Gibbs
Founder and President
The FreeBSD Foundation

DAHDI/FreeBSD Project Completed

Max Khon has completed the DAHDI Project and provides the following report:

I am pleased to announce the completion of the DAHDI/FreeBSD project.

DAHDI (Digium/Asterisk Hardware Device Interface) is an open-source device driver framework and a set of HW drivers for E1/T1, ISDN digital and FXO/FXS analog cards.

The main goal of this funded project was to make it possible to use FreeBSD as a base system for software PBX solutions.

Currently, most of the DAHDI bits have been ported, including the DAHDI framework itself, HW drivers, TDMoE drivers, drivers for software and HW echo cancellation (Octasic, VPMADT032) and HW transcoding (TC400B). The project is hosted in the official DAHDI SVN repository.

misc/dahdi in the FreeBSD ports collection now contains the most recent bits of DAHDI/FreeBSD and also some stuff that is not available in DAHDI/FreeBSD SVN due to licensing and copyright restrictions. These include the OSLEC echo canceler and the experimental zaphfc driver.

I will continue periodic merges from DAHDI/Linux SVN on a regular basis and roll out new DAHDI/FreeBSD releases. These will most likely be synchronized with DAHDI/Linux releases.

Userland DTrace Support

Rui Paulo recently committed to FreeBSD HEAD the userland DTrace support, marking the completion of this FreeBSD Foundation sponsored project. Rui summarizes his work as follows:

DTrace, which originated on Solaris 10, is a comprehensive tracing framework that allows the instrumentation of software. FreeBSD has had DTrace support since 7.0, but until now tracing userland programs was not possible. Now that this project is complete, anyone can use DTrace with userland programs.

Tracing and instrumenting userland programs is very important because it allows the understanding of what's going on, especially on highly complex systems such as databases, web servers, and language interpreters. Since DTrace on FreeBSD now has the ability to instrument both the kernel and the userland program, you can get very meaningful data on how your program is behaving and why.

Companies building products on FreeBSD now have the ability to create better products and find about problems faster then before.

This project focused on allowing the creation of DTrace pid probes, userland statically defined probes (aka USDT), importing plockstat (a DTrace utility to measure lock contention in the pthread library), importing dtruss (a system call tracing utility similar to ktrace) and enabling FreeBSD DTrace support on MySQL and PostgreSQL.

Merges to upcoming FreeBSD releases (8.2 and 7.3) are being thought out, but it's likely they will happen.

FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization Project Completed

We're pleased to announce the completion of the foundation funded FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization project. Here's a summary of the project by Bjoern Zeeb, the developer on the project.

I am happy to report that the funded parts of the FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization project are completed. Some of the results have been shipping with 8.1-RELEASE while others are ready to be merged to HEAD.

Jails have been the well known operating system level virtualization technique in FreeBSD for over a decade. The import of Marko Zec's network stack virtualization has introduced a new way for abstracting subsystems. As part of this project, the abstraction framework has been generalized. Together with Jamie Gritton's flexible jail configuration syscalls, this will provide the infrastructure for, and will ease the virtualization of, further subsystems without much code duplication. The next subsystems to be virtualized will likely be SYSV/Posix IPC to help, for example, PostgreSQL users. This will probably be followed by the process namespace.

Along with the framework, debugging facilities, such as the interactive kernel debugger, have been enhanced so that every new subsystem will be able to immediately make use of these improvements without modifying a single line of code. Libjail and jls can now work on core dumps and netstat is able to query individual live network stacks attached to jails.

For the virtual network stack, work was focused on network stack teardown, a concept introduced with the network stack virtualization. The primary goal was to prototype a shutdown of the (virtual) network stacks from top to bottom, which means letting interfaces go last rather than first and still being able to cleanly shutdown TCP connections. Good progress was made, but a lot of code over the last two decades was never written in a way to be cleanly stopped. Work on this will have to continue, along with virtualizing the remaining network subsystems to allow long term stability and a leak and panic free shutdown. As a side effect, users of non-virtualized network stacks will also benefit, as other general network stack problems are identified and fixed along the way.

I am happy to see more early adopters, former OpenSolaris users, and people contributing code or reporting problems and would like to encourage people to further support this project.

My special thanks go the FreeBSD Foundation and CK Software GmbH for having sponsored this project, as well as to John Baldwin and Philip Paeps for helping with review and excellent suggestions.

Accepting Travel Grant Applications for EuroBSDCon 2010!

Calling all FreeBSD developers needing assistance with travel expenses to EuroBSDCon 2010.

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the Travel Grant Request Application at http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/documents/TravelRequestForm.pdf by September 3, 2010 to apply for this grant.

How it works:

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates.

(1) You request funding based on a realistic and economical estimate of travel costs (economy airfare, trainfare, ...), accommodations (conference hotel and sharing a room), and registration or tutorial fees. If there are other sponsors willing to cover costs, such as your employer or the conference, we prefer you talk to them first, as our budget is limited. We are happy to split costs with you or another sponsor, such as just covering airfare or board.

If you are a speaker at the conference, we expect the conference to cover your travel costs, and will most likely not approve your direct request to us.

(2) We review your application and if approved, authorize you to seek reimbursement up to a limit. We consider several factors, including our overall and per-event budgets, and (quite importantly) the benefit to the community by funding your travel.

Most rejected applications are rejected because of an over-all limit on travel budget for the event or year, due to unrealistic or uneconomical costing, or because there is an unclear or unconvincing argument that funding the applicant will directly benefit the FreeBSD Project. Please take these points into consideration when writing your application.

(3) We reimburse costs based on actuals (receipts), and by check or bank transfer. And, we do not cover your costs if you end up having to cancel your trip. We require you to submit a report on your trip, which we may show to current or potential sponsors, and may include in our semi-annual newsletter.

There's some flexibility in the mechanism, so talk to us if something about the model doesn't quite work for you or if you have any questions. The travel grant program is one of the most effective ways we can spend money to help support the FreeBSD Project, as it helps developers get together in the same place at the same time, and helps advertise and advocate FreeBSD in the larger community.

2009 End-of-Year Fund-raising Campaign!

Since the start of our 'Be Counted!' campaign in August of this year, over 350 new and returning donors have contributed to the FreeBSD Foundation. With your help, we are now 50% of the way to meeting our 2009 fund raising goal. Thank you donors, for your support! Now, in these last few weeks of 2009, the FreeBSD Foundation needs the support of those who have yet to donate to take us the rest of the way.

The recession has hit everyone hard. For many, every possible expense has been cut, and what spending they do is out of strict necessity. Unfortunately the challenges facing FreeBSD are undiminished by recessions and the technological landscape continues to change at a rampant pace. That is why the FreeBSD Foundation nearly doubled its 2008 budget for 2009 and needs your support so we can avoid cutting our investments in 2010.

If you benefit from FreeBSD, please donate so:

  • development projects are funded to support emerging technologies such as solid state disks, USB 3.0, machine and network virtualization, highly parallel processors, clustering, and data replication.
  • BSD conferences continue around the globe.
  • students and contributors have the opportunity to attend conferences and developer summits.
  • the infrastructure of computers and equipment supporting our community can be maintained.
  • the FreeBSD community is grown through marketing and outreach to users and businesses.
  • FreeBSD trademarks are protected and the project has access to legal counsel.
  • FreeBSD continues to serve as the foundation for research and enterprise.

Every donation, no matter its size, makes this work possible. As a non-profit with very low overhead, your donation is the best way to invest in FreeBSD. Please make that investment today so we can meet our dual goals for 2009 of 1000 donors and $300,000.

You can make a donation (including recurring subscriptions) by going to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/.

Be Counted Campaign!

Millions of systems run FreeBSD. Hundreds of volunteers contribute to FreeBSD's success. But what is the size of FreeBSD's user base? This simple question is very hard to answer, but its answer is vital to the cause of promoting FreeBSD. It is extremely difficult to convince businesses to invest time and money to add FreeBSD support to their products based solely on vague estimates of the size of our community. We should know - working to make FreeBSD a more widely supported platform is a task the FreeBSD Foundation has worked on since its inception.

Please help us in our fight to promote FreeBSD. A donation to the FreeBSD Foundation helps fund our work, but it also gives us strength in numbers. Our count of unique donors is a vital indication of the size and buying power of our community. However, we have never broken even one thousand donors in any year. We know in our hearts that this is a small fraction of our user base and of those who want to help expand FreeBSD's presence.

So stand up and be counted! Make a donation. Encourage other FreeBSD users to donate as well. No donation amount is too large or too small. Just by becoming a donor you are making a powerful statement about the strength of FreeBSD!

You can make a donation by going to: http://www.freebsdfoundation.org/donate/.